first-race

1969, The First Race

first-race

Contribute

We want to hear your Kinetic Sculpture Racing stories, look at your pictures and go with you, where only you can take us.

Here are a few options for you to start sharing:

Email us: Below – send us your email, we will add you to the shared Google drive folder. You can create a folder (with your name on it) and put your stories, pics, diagrams, ephemera and memorabilia into the folder. You will be able to see other folk’s folders, and they will be able to see yours.

 

Join the FaceBook group: stay up to date on new stories, photos and folks looking for other folks to tell their stories.

Google +: If you are on Google +, you can contact us at Kinetic Kompendium Google + Group.

Here is the direct link to request to be added to the shared Google Drive group: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-A6fjWnRQ22fmd1ZjRQRFdERkJRQVV5dVczQTV1b2xJbi1fcjJQMmM4UVBoWDlkbmxlV00

Call us: (707) 245-4735 and we can interview you, and chat about your experiences.

TeamMelvin2010Water

Wikipedia Tells All – for inquiring minds…

From Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinetic_sculpture_race

“The concept of kinetic sculpture racing originated in Ferndale, California in 1969 when local sculptor Hobart Brown “improved” the appearance of his son’s tricycle by welding on two additional wheels and other embellishments. Seeing this “Pentacycle,” fellow artist Jack Mays challenged him to a race. Others later joined in creating a field of twelve machines that inaugurated the first race down Ferndale’s Main Street during the town’s annual art festival. Neither Hobart Brown nor Mays won; instead, the first winner was Bob Brown of Eureka, California whose sculpture was a smoke-emitting Turtle that laid eggs. The race received broad publicity when photos of Congressman Don Clausen riding the Pentacycle were seen nationally.[15]

The event was repeated in 1970, and the course subsequently expanded to include cross-country terrain. When affiliated races were initiated in other cities and the course grew, the Ferndale event became the World Championship, and has grown into the largest single event in Humboldt County.[16]

During the 1970s, the race adopted its present three day, cross-country format and became the “Triathlon of the Art World.” Machines tackled mud, sand, water, gravel and pavement. Stan Bennett’s book Crazy Contraptionschronicles the first five years of the race.[15] In the early 1980s, Hobart Brown was referred to as the “Glorious Founder of the Kinetic Race” in a spectators’ brochure.[17]

As the 1980s ended, a mineral water company began sponsoring the race, which adopted a family-friendly approach. Soon after, a local manufacturer of sports racks and car storage boxes became interested in the race. The sponsors’ financial support—especially the creation of the Kinetic Lab in Arcata—took the race to a new level of art and engineering. The Lab’s 92 feet (28 m) long sculpture Yakima KingFish was the longest ever raced according to its creator.[citation needed]

During the 1990s, the race matured. Many contestants were younger than the race, having grown up with its philosophy, “Adults having fun so children will want to grow older,” coined by Brown.[18] As age and crippling arthritis limited his activities, he sold the race rights, the kinetic chicken logo and the trademark “For the Glory” slogan to a new not-for-profit agency called the Humboldt Kinetic Association in 2002.[5][19]

Changing economics caused the sport rack company to leave the area and the water company to end their sponsorship. With no major sponsor and several years of county budget cutbacks reflecting statewide budget problems, the race experienced difficulties.[20] In early 2007, Humboldt Kinetic Association abjured responsibility for the race. Race volunteers rapidly created Kinetic Universe, a new not-for-profit, to manage the 2007 race.[19] It was at this time that the races title was changed to Kinetic Grand Championship.[21] In 2009, the New Belgium Brewing Company became a sponsor.[22] In 2013, the annual Mother’s DayKinetic Klassic children’s event moved from Ferndale to Eureka’s waterfront Halverson Park.[23]

In 2014, the World Championship race course covers 42 miles (68 km), crossing a series of sand dunes, Humboldt Bay and theEel River. The race begins on Arcata Plaza with the Saturday noon whistle; the race goes through Eureka and Loleta before reaching the finish line on the third day on Main Street in Ferndale.[16][24] The race is broadcast live on local radio stationKHUM.[25]

cliff_painting

Tell Your Kinetic Racing Story

Welcome. We are Crowdsourcing the content for this project, which means that if you have ever participated in the Kinetic Sculpture Race, the Kinetic Grand Championship or in any other of the myriad of amazing manifestations of Kinetic Sculpture Racing, we want to hear your story.

Here are a few options for you to start sharing:

Email us: Use the form below – send us your email, we will add you to the shared Google drive folder. You can create a folder (with your name on it) and put your stories, pics, diagrams, ephemera and memorabilia into the folder. You will be able to see other folk’s folders, and they will be able to see yours.

Join the FaceBook group: stay up to date on new stories, photos and folks looking for other folks to tell their stories.

Google +: If you are on Google +, you can contact us at Kinetic Kompendium Google + Group.

Here is the direct link to request to be added to the shared Google Drive group: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-A6fjWnRQ22fmd1ZjRQRFdERkJRQVV5dVczQTV1b2xJbi1fcjJQMmM4UVBoWDlkbmxlV00

Call us: (707) 245-4735 and we can interview you, and chat about your experiences.

first-race

Welcome to the Kinetic Kompendium!

Welcome. We are Crowdsourcing the content for this project, which means that if you have ever participated in the Kinetic Sculpture Race, the Kinetic Grand Championship or in any other of the myriad of amazing manifestations of Kinetic Sculpture Racing, we want to hear your story.

Here are a few options for you to start sharing:

Email us: Kinetic Kompendium – send us your email, we will add you to the shared Google drive folder. You can create a folder (with your name on it) and put your stories, pics, diagrams, ephemera and memorabilia into the folder. You will be able to see other folk’s folders, and they will be able to see yours.

Join the FaceBook group: stay up to date on new stories, photos and folks looking for other folks to tell their stories.

Google +: If you are on Google +, you can contact us at Kinetic Kompendium Google + Group.

Here is the direct link to request to be added to the shared Google Drive group: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-A6fjWnRQ22fmd1ZjRQRFdERkJRQVV5dVczQTV1b2xJbi1fcjJQMmM4UVBoWDlkbmxlV00

Call us: (707) 245-4735 and we can interview you, and chat about your experiences.